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Looking for a job is certainly not always an easy thing, especially if it's your first one and you’ve not got much experience yet. A new study published this week highlights how it’s generally easier for privileged young people to secure themselves work placements.
 
Debrett’s, a foundation that aims to promote social mobility by helping high-achievers from less privileged backgrounds, has published research that reveals that nepotism is still rife in the world of work. Debrett’s conducted research amongst 3,000 16-25 year olds in the UK as well as 2000 individuals aged 30 or more.
 
The findings revealed that it isn’t easy for young people to find work placements. Debrett’s indicated that it’s a case of “who you know, not what you know”, which helps young people get their foot on the career ladder. 72% of those from privileged backgrounds admitted that family connections had helped them land an internship. The CEO of Debrett’s, Joanne Milner, commented: “Nepotism isn’t any more widespread than it was in the past, but it has a greater impact today.” She also added: “There are so many candidates for the top graduate jobs – it follows that those with the best experience have a better chance of securing them.”

A quarter of the young Brits felt having a double-barrelled name was an advantage when looking for an internship, whilst a fifth considered it to be easier for those who had been to a good school. In addition, it also emerges that pupils from private schools have double the chances of obtaining an internship in London. Only 15% of youth from underprivileged backgrounds took work placements in London as they couldn’t afford the costs it entailed, such as that of commuting.
 
On average, young people have to complete seven placements before it leads to a job. Furthermore, one in 10 of the young participants revealed they had done 15 placements before getting a job offer they really wanted. These findings indicate how crucial work experience has become in the process of starting your career.