link.png Looking ahead: the changing world of work← Back


Image source - B Team

B Team is a nonprofit initiative co-founded by Richard Branson, founder of the Virgin group, and Jochen Zeitz, director of luxury conglomerate Kering, with the aim of bringing CEO’s together and creating better ways of doing business. One of the organisation’s latest moves has been to publish a report on ‘New Ways of Working’.

The new report looks ahead to the future of the workplace, taking into account the driving factors behind the changes in the way we work and examining how businesses need to be adapting to these changes.
The report examines the different generations, from the Traditionalists in their seventies to Gen Z, the generation still in late teenage years, establishing that multi-generational workplaces are becoming increasingly common. It also indicates that relationships in the workplace are evolving as traditional hierarchical systems are flattened out.

Image source - B Team

In the light of this, companies who want to get ahead need to market themselves as a brand that is appealing to prospective employees. Citing Deloitte’s ‘Courting the Candidate Report’, the B Team suggests that companies need to treat candidates in a similar way they would approach a customer. Companies are going to have to sell themselves as an attractive workplace.
The B Team highlights that the recruitment process is set to change: no longer a case of one-off candidate searches for specific vacancies, companies will need to be in continuous interaction with “talent communities”. LinkedIn is given as an example of a network which is already fostering this type of dialogue between employers and talent, with the conjecture that more networks of this type have yet to emerge. Recruitment is going to be driven by relationship building.
 
The report concludes by commenting that with these changes, the way we perceive success is inevitably going to have to be reconsidered. Rather than simply being measured according to salary and status, success is to become increasingly linked to an individual’s own career choices and achievements.